Valerie Yules Letters

March 15, 2012

The social value of middle-aged spread

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , , , , — valerieyulesletters @ 2:36 am

 

My theory about the middle-aged spread (10 March, p 48) is that it has a world-wide social purpose, in imparting gravitas and importance to the wise elders and warm cuddliness to grandparents for the grandchildren.  The size of the middle-aged is important to society. Our modern age forgets this because it emphasises youth and slimness.

 

March 10, 2012

Articles on political and social issues

 

The future of fire in Australia
Environment – 28/02/2012 – 14 comments
Rapid obsolescence as a form of waste
Economics – 3/02/2012 – 6 comments
The effects of violent video games
Media – 19/01/2012 – 7 comments
The curse of the McMansion
Economics – 24/11/2011 – 7 comments
Free trade and fair trade
September 2011 Feature – 19/09/2011 – 11 comments
Bias on ABC Radio National
Media – 6/09/2011 – 38 comments
Climate change at Radio National
Media – 12/08/2011 – 39 comments
Ageing populations need not be disastrous for Western governments
Society – 27/07/2011 – 29 comments
Our age of paradoxes
Society – 31/05/2011 – 5 comments
The Arabian Nights and Muslim beliefs and practices
Religion & Spirituality – 4/05/2011
How puny are you?
Environment – 8/04/2011 – 19 comments
Unnecessary costs of the elderly
Society – 31/03/2011 – 13 comments
Australian consumers, and our floods and cyclones
Economics – 9/02/2011
Challenges and responses to disasters
Nation Building – 19/01/2011 – 1 comment
Spare that tree: the arithmetic of supply and demand
Environment – 23/12/2010 – 5 comments
Nothing over a million dollars
Society – 14/12/2010 – 37 comments
The cost of elections
Domestic Politics – 12/10/2010 – 5 comments
Don’t waste the Murray River!
Environment – 1/07/2010 – 3 comments
Ballyhoo and balloons: political elections
Domestic Politics – 23/02/2010 – 3 comments
We’ve never had it so good
Society – 9/02/2010 – 7 comments
What a difference a lot of humans make
Society – 21/01/2010 – 6 comments
Combatting prejudice: African Australian refugee youth
Society – 19/08/2009 – 6 comments
The Internet at home – a member of the family
August 2009 Feature – 5/08/2009
A stitch in time …
Society – 25/06/2009 – 9 comments
Damage control – a greater problem than climate change
Environment – 14/05/2009 – 34 comments
Carbon trading has problems
Environment – 5/03/2009 – 7 comments
Housing for our changing climates
Environment – 23/02/2009 – 17 comments
ABC TV for children
Media – 22/12/2008 – 4 comments
Rupert Murdoch on education for the disadvantaged
Education – 4/12/2008 – 1 comment
Manufacturing, jobs and low technology
Science & Technology – 9/10/2008 – 12 comments
Language and literacy
Education – 8/09/2008 – 2 comments
Could the Olympic Games become fair sport?
Sport – 27/08/2008 – 7 comments
An audit for educational disadvantage
Education – 15/08/2008 – 9 comments
Cardinal Pell’s babies – quantity or quality
Society – 31/07/2008 – 18 comments
Marriages for the modern world
Society – 16/07/2008 – 7 comments
Who owns your sewage?
Environment – 3/07/2008 – 8 comments
The case for an Australian-made small second car
Environment – 5/06/2008 – 29 comments
Rubbishing on about plastic bags
Environment – 30/04/2008 – 12 comments
An ambit claim for the Ruddfest 2020
March 2008 Feature – 11/03/2008 – 2 comments
Revolutionary change in education
February 2008 Feature – 20/02/2008 – 10 comments
Cutting waste – saving the planet without destroying economies
Environment – 7/02/2008 – 19 comments
Australian citizenship and human rights
Law & Liberties – 17/01/2008 – 12 comments
Population is not a front page issue
Environment – 17/12/2007 – 43 comments
Improving politicians’ behaviour
Domestic Politics – 5/12/2007 – 11 comments
The big election myth – is the economy strong?
Economics – 24/10/2007 – 62 comments
Compensation as a right?
Health – 8/10/2007 – 10 comments

March 7, 2012

Filed under: social problems — Tags: , — valerieyulesletters @ 6:12 am

Differences between religions are seen as differences in theology and religious practices. People of different faiths come to argue about these differences and similarities, in order to reach some unity, or to emphasise their own singularity.

However, the basic difference between them is not discussed.  That is, people on the whole believe what their family believes.  Then their arguments are to support what they have been taught.  Even humanists and atheists are part of this.  And in discussing religion they forget this.  It would be a great advance in thinking if we constantly recollected it.

It would make a great difference in the world’s thinking and clarify conflicts if a person’s religion was stated in terms of his family.  If he held the religion of his family, then he would be called Family-Christian, Family-Muslin, Family-Buddhist, Family-Agnostic, Family-Atheist or whatever.  If he had converted to some other religion or none, he would be called Convert-Christian, Convert-Humanist, or Convert-Muslim, or whatever.  Children at school would of course be called Family-(whatever) and not treated as tho they had thought things out themselves.

Often the Family-Religion is that of the nation also, or a religion derives its status or qualities from national pride.

Top dogs like to be top dog in religion too, and satraps follow suit. National religions include British Israelite (beards and more like lost ten tribes than Mormon pairs in suits).  If US had not trumped Brits as top dog, the world might now be taking to British Israelites rather than Mormons proselytising across the world. Nazis invented their own semi-Wagnerian Aryan religion which they dated way way back.  Romans liked to have deep classical roots too, c.f Virgil’s Aeneid, which linked them with Homer’s Troy.

And of course the C of E is deeply a part of the English nation, and Judaism part of the Jewish people. Islam is spreading partly as anti-Americanism.

Think about it.

Victorian Humanist  March 2012 p 6

Family-Religion and Convert-Religion

Filed under: social problems — Tags: , — valerieyulesletters @ 5:53 am

Differences between religions are seen as differences in theology and religious practices. People of different faiths come to argue about these differences and similarities, in order to reach some unity, or to emphasise their own singularity.

 

However, the basic difference between them is not discussed.  That is, people on the whole believe what their family believes.  Then their arguments are to support what they have been taught.  Even humanists and atheists are part of this.  And in discussing religion they forget this.  It would be a great advance in thinking if we constantly recollected it.

 

It would make a great difference in the world’s thinking and clarify conflicts if a person’s religion was stated in terms of his family.  If he held the religion of his family, then he would be called Family-Christian, Family-Muslin, Family-Buddhist, Family-Agnostic, Family-Atheist or whatever.  If he had converted to some other religion or none, he would be called Convert-Christian, Convert-Humanist, or Convert-Muslim, or whatever.  Childlren at school would of course be called Family-(whatever) and not treated as tho they had thought things out themselves.

 

Often the Family-Religion is that of the nation also, or a religion derives its status or qualities from national pride.

Top dogs like to be top dog in religion too, and satraps follow suit. National religions include British Israelite (beards and more like lost ten tribes than Mormon pairs in suits).  If US had not trumped Brits as top dog, the world might now be taking to British Israelites rather than Mormons proselytising across the world. Nazis invented their own semi-Wagnerian Aryan religion which they dated way way back.  Romans liked to have deep classical roots too, c.f Virgil’s Aeneid, which linked them with Homer’s Troy.

And of course the C of E is deeply a part of the English nation, and Judaism part of the Jewish people. Islam is spreading partly as anti-Americanism.

 

Think about it.

Victorian Humanist  March 2012 p 6

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