Valerie Yules Letters

March 17, 2013

Fallacies used to retain present spelling unchanged

http://www.newstatesman.com/culture/2013/03/reviewed-does-spelling-matter-simon-horobin

Five errors need correcting in this book. First, almost every other modern language, exept English, has had some degree of successful change, major or minor, that updated its writing system (Writing systems and how they change, Yule, in press). The fights are often long and continuing, but the changes enable mor pepl to read and rite. Remember that the Arabic number sistem, essential for modern sience, took 500 years to be acsepted over the Latin numerals in some parts of Europe!
Second, Simon Horabin confuses phonetic (sounds of speech) and phonemic (sounds as represented in a ritten language). The word DOG (phonemic spelling) is pronounced meny diffrent ways in spoken English, from dawg to dahg (phonetic pronunciations), but we all think we are saying DOG.
Third,” in order to preserve the richness, subtlety and history of our language” Horabin claims that we must keep spelling unchanged. Our spelling has continued to change since Samuel Johnson, e.g. – e.g. horror and economic for horrour and oeconomick.) but change is stopped by our Spelling Checker. Most literat peple cannot spell without a Spelling Checker. Most peple, however well educated, cannot spell 16 common words which have surplus letters. (http://home.vicnet.net.au/~ozideas/spelling.htm#word)
If spelling checkers changed, we would change our spelling too.

4. Dictionries and other books tell us the
history of our language. Updating spelling does not uproot our culture. Experiment and see. http://home.vicnet.net.au/ozideas/spelling.htm an index page about spelling

5. Noam Chomsky’s statement that English spelling ‘comes remarkably close to being . . .an optimal system’ was made in one regard only. I have examind this one regard and even then there are caveats. (Carol wrote in the Harvard Educational Review that it enabled one to see the relationship of PRODIGAL and PRODIGIOUS.) I have a letter (not email) from Noam Chomsky himself in which he regrets the wide misuse of his statement, and says he is sympathetic to ideas of spelling reform, properly conducted.

http://home.vicnet.net.au/ozideas/writsys.htm – Other writing systems of the world, their advantages and disadvantages, and how many have been reformed

http://home.vicnet.net.au/ozideas/sprules1p.htm English spelling rules on one page

Declining populations need a new economic theory and practice, not raising populations

Filed under: conservation, social problems — Tags: , , , , , , , — valerieyulesletters @ 3:25 am

We are now in the middle of perhaps the greatest demographic change in recorded history.(Mike Seccombe)

The fact of low-fertility, declining populations should not be seen only in the light of the financial profit consequence of ageing populations, but as a rational response to the world’s present and increasing shortages of water and other essential natural resources, cramped life-styles of the masses, decreasing land for wildlife, and increasing challenges of climate changes. It is irrational to think that we must always have growth of economic production requiring growth of population. The continued population growth of Africa sets problems of political instability, forced emigrations, droughts, loss of wildlife and jungles, increasing deserts and continued oppression of women.
The problem of ageing populations needs to be met by other means than increasing birthrates. The healthy old are an asset not a burden. The sick aged are a burden on other people to care for them, that is, demands on labor, with minimum need for economic production of goods to keep them alive. We must solve the problem of the chronic slow dying of the ‘struldbrugs’ that we must fear for ourselves.
We must change our model of economic production and profit to meet declining populations. World population in 1950 was far fewer than now; it was not excessive. We might retreat to those figures.

March 15, 2013

Filed under: climate, social innovations, Uncategorized — valerieyulesletters @ 10:06 am

Jonathan Swift’s Journal at the end of the 20th century
Gulliver travels round the islands on the edges of insanity

What childish and malevolent gods instigated the events reported during the twentieth century? “Whom the gods destroy, they first make mad.” Has the beginning of this century been any better?

An illustration showed a piece of highly expensive military hardware moving through an Eritrean landscape turning to desert as its last stunted trees went for firewood, in a country spending millions buying MiG 23 fighter jets. Argentinian police wore pantaloon fancy dress with headbags as they made a brutal arrest. The Jews with their long history of expulsions from almost everywhere, were at work in Israel and Palestine expelling others from their homes.
The names, Swift could hardly invent. In Nigeria General Olusegun Obasanjo was having a challenge with General Abdulsalam Abubakar. In Israel, Dahlia Rabin-Philosof and Ronnie Milo were protesting against the demands of the ultra-orthodox, who were running pray-ins to support their claims. The Argentinians have a police station at Moron. Zimbabwe student leader is Learnmore Jongwe.
An art forger’s ‘Alice in Wonderland’ defence involved shady arms deals, international intrigue and complex conspiracy theories, as he made millions from art dealers’ inability to distinguish pictures ‘worth’ millions from pictures worth nothing. There was Zippergate in USA; in France youngsters imitated the US President Clinton’s ofJonathan Swift’s Journal at the end of the 20th century
Gulliver travels round the islands on the edges of insanity

What childish and malevolent gods instigated the events reported during the twentieth century? “Whom the gods destroy, they first make mad.” Has the beginning of this century been any better?

An illustration showed a piece of highly expensive military hardware moving through an Eritrean landscape turning to desert as its last stunted trees went for firewood, in a country spending millions buying MiG 23 fighter jets. Argentinian police wore pantaloon fancy dress with headbags as they made a brutal arrest. The Jews with their long history of expulsions from almost everywhere, were at work in Israel and Palestine expelling others from their homes.
The names, Swift could hardly invent. In Nigeria General Olusegun Obasanjo was having a challenge with General Abdulsalam Abubakar. In Israel, Dahlia Rabin-Philosof and Ronnie Milo were protesting against the demands of the ultra-orthodox, who were running pray-ins to support their claims. The Argentinians have a police station at Moron. Zimbabwe student leader is Learnmore Jongwe.
An art forger’s ‘Alice in Wonderland’ defence involved shady arms deals, international intrigue and complex conspiracy theories, as he made millions from art dealers’ inability to distinguish pictures ‘worth’ millions from pictures worth nothing. There was Zippergate in USA; in France youngsters imitated the US President Clinton’s offensive behaviour in a computer game.
A box office success was a film that plays pretend games about the Holocaust. One lone ex-smoker won $51.5 million damages from a tobacco company. A possibly lethal genetical engineering biotechnology was lobbying for freedom in the name of trade, and for patents are being granted for life-forms that have existed free for thousands of years. The most prominent games in Olympics sports are about drugs and bribes. The Chinese are having economic problems ironically, exacerbated because people want to spend rather than save, but if they devalue, a few dozen speculators may move in and the whole global economy can go crackers. Imaginary planes like the Russians had were far better than what our military industrial complex costs us.
Is all this forgotten already?
Surely it is time for our writers and artists to stop embroiling themselves in perpetuating our madness in writing on the same themes, and start to try to envision a way out.

The next century, now.
fensive behaviour in a computer game.
A box office success was a film that plays pretend games about the Holocaust. One lone ex-smoker won $51.5 million damages from a tobacco company. A possibly lethal genetical engineering biotechnology was lobbying for freedom in the name of trade, and for patents are being granted for life-forms that have existed free for thousands of years. The most prominent games in Olympics sports are about drugs and bribes. The Chinese are having economic problems ironically, exacerbated because people want to spend rather than save, but if they devalue, a few dozen speculators may move in and the whole global economy can go crackers. Imaginary planes like the Russians had were far better than what our military industrial complex costs us.
Is all this forgotten already?
Surely it is time for our writers and artists to stop embroiling themselves in perpetuating our madness in writing on the same themes, and start to try to envision a way out.

The next century, now.

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